Category Archives: Bread

May 21st, 2016

Bread on a Stick

Stockbrot (4)The weather on Pentecost was far away from being warm and sunny, but it was not rainy, either. And so my mum and I take my niece and nephew into the woods to collect hazelnut sticks for making bread on a stick. Before we left my – near to five years old niece – had already kneaded the dough (with some help from my mum). This girl really takes after this side of the family and can knead dough already like a pro.

In the woods we found some fir cones as well which we used then to start a fire when we were back in the garden. We let the fire burn down to glow, as this gives a much more regular heat and the bread on stick bakes regular without burning. Our fire place is a old metal baby bath tube and its rims has the perfect high for placing the sticks on it. You just have to turn them a bit once in a while to ensure that the bread bakes on all sides.

We had a lot of fun with our stick on bread, it is a  great pleasure for the whole family.

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May 15th, 2016

Light Rye Bread

LichtkornroggenbrotI like to bake “by order” as I can then bake bread I bake rather seldom. Pure Rye bread, for example, as I have a rather sensitive stomach who do not like the higher acidity of rye bread. And while I do not eat rye bread I still like to bake it. Its different consistency makes it a bit challenging and is a nice change in my wheat- and spelt-dough routine.

For this bread which I bake for a big birthday I choose so called “Lichtkornroggen”. This is a rye variety  containing light coloured rye seeds instead of the normal grey green coloured rye. It is a modern back breeding from ancient rye varieties and yields a lighter bread then normal whole rye flour. Its flavour is milder as well and so I build the sourdough in the classical german “three stages”: The so called “Anfrischsauer” (refreshed sourdough) to activate the yeasts is then followed by the low hydrated “Grundsauer” (basic sourdough) to generate a well balanced acidity and the last step called “Vollsauer” (complete sourdough) in which the warm and soft dough is perfect for yeast and homofermenting lactobacteria and in which the sourdough develops a lot of activity. Continue reading

May 10th, 2016

Onion Bread

Zwiebelbrot (5)Reader’s wishes are a good thing. They often give me new impulses or remind me of – sometime to obvious – breads. And when Julia wrote that a recipe for onion bread would be a fine idea, I was thinking: of course! And for the past long, sunny weekend I started to create a recipe.

A crucial part of onion bread is fried onions. And as I do not like the store bought ones very much I decided to go for homemade fried onions, too. For a better contrast I chose red onions for that. They are fried in oil until all of their water evaporates and are very crips. About 300g fresh onions yields 100g fried ones.

For the form I chose two different ones: the “classical” onion batard and round loaves with a half onion in the middle. These breads are a nice eye catcher for a buffet, but the batards are easier to cut.

 

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May 6th, 2016

Bread Crisps

Brotchips

Bread crumbs, Ofenschlupfer or Semmelknödel are the standard recipes I use when I have left over bread. Another good idea for using stale bread is making  bread crisps.

They are easy to make and a delicious snack. Preferably I use old rolls as a sliced roll has the perfect snacking size. And if the rolls was a sesame or poppy seed roll they are especially delicious, as the seeds add a delicious nutty flavour.

You can keep the bread crisps quit simple and only seasoned with some salt. Or you use a wild garlic salt or a bit of harrisa to flavour the oil.

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April 16th, 2016

Rye Bread without Sourdough

Roggenmischbrot ohne Sauerteig (1)In January a reader asked me about a recipe for dark bread with lots of rye, but without Sourdough. I needed time to think about a recipe, but finally a recipe began to form in my head. As rye needs acid for baking, I choose butter milk as liquid. The complex flavour is created by a rye poolish and a soaker made out of dried whole grain bread crumbs. The bread is in the style of a dark farmers bread with 70% rye. The buttermilk adds a noticeable but mild acidity like you would find in a mild sourdough bread.

To create the fine cracked pattern on the crust, the loaf are turned on the peel already 20 minutes prior baking and left uncovered. This results into a slight drying of the skin of the loaf and as is spread a bit during this time as well, it will create cracks on the surface. Adding steam after 30 seconds of baking will enhance the effect as well.

After all, it is a good bread with a moist, regular crumb and a thick, flavourful crust. And as it is made without sourdough it is although a nice start for bread baking beginners who want a easier start into rye breads.

 

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April 10th, 2016

Oat Twins

Haferzwillinge (3)The second bread wich I baked for the “Schwarzmarkt” was a oatmeal bread. My love for oat shines through one or the other recipe and so I made up my mind quite fast that a bread with oats would be a “must have” for the Schwarzmarkt. This time I opted for a rolled oats partly as porridge, and partly roasted. The porridge makes the bread moist and keeps it fresh for a long time, while the roasted oats add flavour and a nice texture to the crumb. The bread is risen by only the sourdough and rye poolish, which makes the flavour deep and complex.

To get four breads into the oven, I decided to bake them as “Twins” which means that I proof two round loaves in one oval proofing basket. The breads fuse while baking on the side they touch each other, but are easily seperated when cooled down.

I like my oat twins very much, with their dark crust and moist crumb, and the slight honey flavour in combination with nutty oats it is harmonize with cheese as well as with honey or jam. A bread, suitable for every meal!

 

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April 3rd, 2016

Whole Grain

Volles Korn (2)It makes me always happy to get my hands into flour and I enjoy it  very much when I have the opportunity to bake more then one kind of bread. This weekend I baked busily as I wanted to have a selection of bread for the “Schwarzmarkt” – the non-commercial food swap market which took place today. I prepared breads with different seeds, breads with oats and whole grain breads.

The whole grain bread is moist as I added some butter and a hot soaker to the dough. And a long, cold proof and the whole grain variant of my sweet starter build a complex flavour and the oven spring is very good and the slashes opend in a nice way. To archive slashes which open nicely and form nice “ears”, these things has proved themselves: a sharp nice (of course), cutting in a shallow angle and a slash in slight crescent shape.

 

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March 27th, 2016

Spelt Easter Pinze

Dinkel-OsterpinzePetras comment here made me thinking about baking this years Easter pinze with sweet starter. I already had a spelt variant in my mind and so I decided to combine both ideas. To keep the pinze moist, I replace the milk with some cream and reduced the amount of butter. Cream has not only a positive effect on the crumb, it is although good if you plan to let the pinze rise over night in the fridge, as the cream will not harden in the cold as butter would do. So the Easter Pinze can rise unaffected and it is easy to serve a oven fresh bread for easter breakfast.

As the dough contains a bit more fat (from the cream) I added some more egg yolk, too. This adds a nice yellow hue to crust and crumb, which is very nice especially on rainy Easter Sundays like it was this year. The pale green eggs in the background of the pictures are from my uncles hens, which belong to the so called “Easter eggers”, a variety of chicken which carries a special gen for a blue to green stained egg shell. So I get a  perfect green Easter egg without staining 🙂

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March 13th, 2016

Tumeric Loaf

Kurkuma-Laib (4)Bright yellow like the sun shines the tumeric loaf on my kitchen counter. And its good that it shines so bright as spring seems to be far away.

It was the first time in my live that I used fresh tumeric. I got very exited when I saw the rhizomes in our small wholefood shop and bought some directly. And while I packed them in my bag I already saw the bread I was going to bake with some  of them. Continue reading

February 27th, 2016

Walnut & Porridge Bread

Walnuss und Hafergrütz-Brot (1)Whenever we spent our vacation in nothern Germany, I have to buy something I have troubles to find in the Rhineland: Steel cut oats! I like them very much, not for the kale stew like it is typical in North Germany, but for making porridge or baking bread. A porridge is such a good addition to a bread, adding some bite and a good deal of moisture and helping to keep the bread fresh for a long time. Especially for spelt bread it is a good addition as spelt has the tendency to bake dry without added soaker.

The bread I baked last week contains the trio of spelt, oat and walnuts. All three are somehow nutty flavoured and it feels natural to me to combine all of them in a bread. The preferment is a whole spelt sourdough which I grow over to stages to contain the mild lactic acid flavour I love so much. And the combination of joghurt-like notes of the sourdough and the nutty flavours of the grain and the nut makes this bread to one these I enjoy most plain or just with some butter and sprinkles of salt flakes. A clear favourite of mine!

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