Category Archives: Overnight

March 29th, 2014

Kastanien-Krusti

Kastanien-Krusti

When I was doing my weekly groceries in the wholefood shop I spotted a bag with chestnut flour. Spontaneously I bought it. But after putting it into the pantry to my other flours I forgot about it. But some weeks later, when I put away a new batch of flour, it came back into my notice. And I started to think about a recipe directly.

At the end I decided to bake chestnut “Krusti”. A Krusti is a german roll for which the dough is rolled into a log and which is then baked seamside up. During ovenspring it will open along the seam, forming a good part of crunchy crust. We like this kind if bread very much.

The chestnut flour added a subtle nutty sweetness flavour and gave crumb and crust a niece brown colour. The crumb is very soft and fluffy, while the crust is crunchy. This roll is a new favourite!

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March 8th, 2014

Sübrot

Sübrot (3)We spent our last summer holiday in the Alsace. And we enjoyed the beautiful landscape, the food and the niece people there very and much – and the bakeries,too! During our holidays I scribbled down a list with breads I had to bake when I’m back home.

Among the breads of this list was the Pain Pavé as well as this Sübrot. Sü comes from Sou which means a very small coin and Brot means bread so Sübrot can be translated to “Penny bread”. During wartimes it was a cheap bread that due to its form could be purchased in pieces as well. And even nowadays I was asked if I wanted the whole loaf or only a part of it when I bought it in a Boulangerie in Strasbourg.

Back home, when I decided to bake my own version, I decided to go to a slow rising dough, which fermented over night at roomtemperature. The next morning I divided the dough, shaped two squares and spread a thin layer of oil on top of one of them. The oil layer hast to be really thin to ensure that the bread do not unfold to quickly in the oven, so I removed a part of it again with a paper towel. And that worked very well, indeed. I was sit in front of the oven all the time, fascinated by the unfolding bread.

And the finished bread is a treat, too: Open crumb, crisp crust and a mild but complex taste!

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February 22nd, 2014

Pain Pavé

Pain Pavé (2)During our last vacation in france I fell in love with the flat, rustic looking Pain Pavé. Pavé means cobblestone and refers to the flat, rectangular shape of the breads. Most of the time they are cut crosswise or with a rhombical pattern.

My version of the Pavé is made with rye sourdough and a long, cold fermentation in the fridge. That helps, together with the folds of the dough, to develope an open crumb and a deep, complex flavour.

It is a bread which goes very well with a flavourful winter soup or very simple with only some goat brie!

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February 16th, 2014

Weekend Rolls

Wochenend-Brötchen

After all the sweet posts something hearty is needed here on the Blog!

At the moment I bake a lot of bread using my sweet starter because I’m still in love with my not sour sourdough. I hope it is not getting boring for you. But the sweet starter allows me even to make dough which can rise in the fridge for 24 hours or longer without degrading the gluten or getting to sour. I used a cold fermented dough already for this baguettes. My weekend rolls work the same way, the dough rise in the cold for 12 to 36 hours and whenever I need rolls on the weekend I take some dough out and bake them freshly. The recipe will yield 10 Rolls, but the recipe can easily be doubled. A perfect recipe for a lazy weekend!

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January 30th, 2014

Oberberger Ärpelbrot

Kartoffelbrot

In the dialect of the region where I live – the Oberbergische Land – potatoes are called “Ärdäppel” which means earth apple. In a shorter variant it is drawn together to “Ärpel”. And putting some potatoes in a bread dough (which makes it to a Ärpelbrot – Potato bread) was a good idea to all times. In former times this helps to save precious flour (especially in regions where grains do not grow so well like here in the Oberbergische Land), and nowadays we like the effect which potatoes have on the bread, keeping it moist and making the crumb soft and tender.

It is a great bread for all meals, and with the curved slashes it is a beautiful eye catcher as well.

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January 26th, 2014

Baguette with sweet Starter

Baguette mit süßem Starter 2I planned to post about a potato bread today (something I will do later this week) but the result of an experiment I baked this weekend made me so enthusiastic that I could not wait to share the recipe with you!

It is a recipe for a baguette made with sweet starter – a very active but not sour sourdough – and a 24 hours rise in the fridge. The Idea to this baguette came to me when I taste a little bit sweet starter which I kept in the fridge for some days. The complexity of the flavour was fascinating. Despite the time the sourdough spent in the fridge it did not taste tangy or acidic. It has a mild flavour of lactic acid, like you would expect it in crème fraiche.  Beside that I could taste fruity tones and slight alcoholic taste due to the high activity of the yeast. It was a taste I wanted to catch in a bread!

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December 22nd, 2013

Potato Rolls out of the bottle

Kartofflbrötchen

This year you can buy a lot of different bread mixes backed in Weck-Flasks. Even our book stores sells them. When I studied the flasks there I realized that they charge ten Euro for 750g of flour, yeast, salt and some spices or seeds! Really, ten Euro? I mean, ok, the Weck flask would cost something about two Euro. But then there are still 8 Euro left for a little bit of flour.

Home again I grabbed an old juice flask and filled it with layers of wheat flour, rye flour and potatoe flakes.  I used the organic instant mashed potatoes from Alnatura which consists only of dry potatoes flakes, salt and spices. Filling the flask took its time, so choosing one with a wide bottle neck would be better! The 500g of flour, potatoe flaks, yeast and salt cost me about 1,20 Euro and the flask was for free. And it is a nice present, even a last minute one, as long as you have the ingredients and a flask/glass with one litre volume at home.

Of course I test-baked the recipe, too! And I was surprised about the potatoey taste of the rolls, and I like their moist crumb and crisp crust very much, too. Maybe I should rethink my “no instant mash potatoe-rule” in favour for easy potato rolls!

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December 12th, 2013

Korianderbrot

KorianderbrotGround Coriander seeds have a long tradition as bread spice. When I roasted some coriander seeds for an indian dish some weeks a go I suddenly had the idea of a bread with whole, roasted coriander seeds in my mind. A bread similar to a caraway seed bread.

Thought and done… The next week I roasted some seeds and put them in a bread dough. I let the dough rise over night at room temperature and the next morning I formed a (big) loaf and baked it.

During baking a aromatic fragrance filled our flat and so it was hard to wait until the bread cooled down before tasting. But the flavour is worth wating! When my teeth hit a seed I can taste the slight peppery flavour of coriander seeds. And like a caraway seed bread goes very well with hearty spreads or cheese. But it is also a perfect side for a soup like the fennel celery soup we had last week.

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November 29th, 2013

Rye Yoghurt Rosebud Rolls

Roggen-Joghurt-Rose kleinLast weekend I baked once again Overnight rolls, something I do nearly every Sunday, when I don’t want to leave home to get freshly baked rolls for breakfast.

This time I baked rosebud rolls. This rolls are called so because during the oven spring their top will spring open like a little rosebud. To enhance this effect, the rolls can be coated with some butter as well, but it is not necessary and so I did it the more simple way.

The recipe uses some rye flour to make the rolls hearty and yoghurt to add a fresh flavour and some moisture to the crumb. The crust stays a little bit softer then of rolls solely baked with water, but that’s how my love liked his breakfast rolls.

The rolls are perfect for breakfast, with a soft, regular crumb and pairs well with either sweet things like honey or jam or an hearty cheese!

Last weekend I baked once again Overnight rolls, something I do nearly every Sunday, when I don’t want to leave home to get freshly baked rolls for breakfast.

This time I baked rosebud rolls. This rolls are called so because during the oven spring their top will spring open like a little rosebud. To enhance this effect, the rolls can be coated with some butter as well, but it is not necessary and so I did it the more simple way.

The recipe uses some rye flour to make the rolls hearty and yoghurt to add a fresh flavour and some moisture to the crumb. The crust stays a little bit softer then of rolls solely baked with water, but that’s how my love liked his breakfast rolls.

The rolls are perfect for breakfast, with a soft, regular crumb and pairs well with either sweet things like honey or jam or an hearty cheese!

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October 26th, 2013

Apple Hazelnut Rolls

Apfel-Haselnuss-Brötchen (2)And here is already the second recipe for freshly baked breakfast rolls. They need – similar to the last recipe – only a short time in the morning until they are ready to bake, but need a little bit more attention the evening before when the dough is prepared. The apple has to be peeled and cut, the soaker has to be made and the nuts hast to be roasted and cut. But the rolls are worth the effort! They are slightly sweet due to honey and apple with the deep flavour of roasted nuts and hazelnut oil, combined with the complex flavour of the long, slow rise over night.

That I soaked the apple pieces together with the rolled oats in boiling water was done by purpose. The apple I use is from an old variety (presumably Jakob Lebel) and turn brownish as soon as you cut them. This change in colour is due to the reaction of an Enzyme in the cells which are demaged by cutting the fruit. To scald the apples with boiling water denatures the enzymes and turns them inactive, so the apple pieces will not turn brown.

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