Category Archives: Overnight

June 24th, 2014

Sesame Flowers

Sesamsonnen

Some month ago, my colleagues had the idea that I should asked the editorial stuff of our coworker journal if they would like to publish one of my recipes. After some very nice mails I started to develop a recipe.  And because I’m working in the botanical institute I decided to bake rolls in form of flowers.

The dough follows my favourite principles: a little bit yeast and a long fermentation in the fridge, which helps to build a great flavour.

And for all who do not read the “Mituns” (which should be most of you), here is the recipe which is printed in the current issue:

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June 13th, 2014

Günther Webers White Bread

Weißbrot nach Günther Weber (2)

Micha praised  Günther Webers book, Lutz like it, too and now I’m joining the chorus: The recipes are great! And yes, the book contains only few recipes, but they are worth every cent! A good example is this gorgeous white bread.

The bread is simple to make and follows my favourite method: the dough rise over night on the kitchen counter. The trick which made the bread so irresistible, is adding a tiny bit of sourdough. This builds a complex, very aromatic flavour. The warm temperature speeded up the fermentation and after 8 hours the dough had already tripled. But it was no problem for me because I’m an early bird. And so I form the bread before the first coffee. And I had the already the feeling that 90 minutes for proofing would be way to much for my lively dough. And so I heated my baking stone directly. And I was right. Already after 40 min the loaves has risen a lot. And after 50 minutes the loaves could not wait any longer and I placed them in the oven. Luckily they had still enough power for a good oven spring.

And the bread I took from the oven was – as mentioned before – just gorgeous: a soft crumb, crisp crust and then an overwhelming flavour. This bread is a new favourite! And I will play around with new overnight recipes with a little bit of sourdough!

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June 9th, 2014

Pentecost Rolls

Pfingst-Brötchen

We spent this Pentecost sunday with my parents in their garden. At evening, when my sister and her family headed home to put their exhausted children to bed, my mum and me started to fill the dishwasher and to tidy the garden. My mum asked me then: “I prepared a poolish in the morning. Do you have an idea for breakfast rolls?” Of course I had and while she collected the toys flying around in the garden, I kneaded a dough and chatted a little bit with my dad. We put the dough in the cold cellar so it could rise overnight.

The next morning my mom send me some pictures from their breakfast table and the note: “The rolls are great” . And so we decided to do this blog post together, with her pictures and my writing and the rolls we did together!

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June 7th, 2014

Hot Walnut Ring with Koharsan Wheat

Feurige Walnuss-RingeThe last time I phoned my sister, she told me about a “Baguette” she ate in a cooking class some days ago. She liked the combination of hot pepper, walnuts and whole spelt flour, but the bread had a very thigh and doughy crumb. So I wrote down the recipe and promised to build a better recipe. For that I had to change nearly the whole recipe.

I take out the egg from the formula (no egg is needed in a baguette), but add a good deal more water but much less yeast. I reduced the amount of walnuts only a little bit for a better balance between bread and nut and added some chopped sweet red pepper for the good look. The amount of hot pepper should be adjusted by the personal taste, the amount of Habenero I used brings the recipe definitely to the hot side. If you want a milder version I would decrease the hot pepper and use more sweet pepper instead.

I kneaded the dough as I would knead a baguette dough and in the end I was rewarded with a soft but not sticky dough. It was easy to form some rings out of it. And after a propper fermenting and proofing time (something the original recipe omit) I was rewarded with a great aromatic bread. The Khorasan wheat, which I used instead of Spelt, gives a sweet nutty flavour to the dough which goes very well with walnuts and hot pepper. And the crumb is nicely open, especially when you consider the high amount of whole grain flour. A perfect bread to bring to a BBQ or to eat as a side with a summer salad!

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May 17th, 2014

Knots (baked with brewers yeast)

Knöpfchen (1)

Until the 18th century bakers went to the next brewery to get some yeast for baking. Even the name of the yeast we use for baking shows that it was originally used for making beer: Saccharomyces cervicae. But when the new bottom fermenting yeast strain Saccharomyces carlsbergensis used by more and more breweries getting yeast for baking was not possible anymore because this yeast stays on the bottom of fermenting vessel (instead on floating on top like S. cervicae.) And so the first commercial produced yeast for bakers appeared on the market in 1780.

When my love and me brew beer it always breaks my heart to throw away the yeast which remains after bottling. And because I search ancient recipes for this month BBD, I decided to bake rolls using the beer yeast instead of the “normal” bakers yeast (which is the same species, anyway).

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March 29th, 2014

Kastanien-Krusti

Kastanien-Krusti

When I was doing my weekly groceries in the wholefood shop I spotted a bag with chestnut flour. Spontaneously I bought it. But after putting it into the pantry to my other flours I forgot about it. But some weeks later, when I put away a new batch of flour, it came back into my notice. And I started to think about a recipe directly.

At the end I decided to bake chestnut “Krusti”. A Krusti is a german roll for which the dough is rolled into a log and which is then baked seamside up. During ovenspring it will open along the seam, forming a good part of crunchy crust. We like this kind if bread very much.

The chestnut flour added a subtle nutty sweetness flavour and gave crumb and crust a niece brown colour. The crumb is very soft and fluffy, while the crust is crunchy. This roll is a new favourite!

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March 8th, 2014

Sübrot

Sübrot (3)We spent our last summer holiday in the Alsace. And we enjoyed the beautiful landscape, the food and the niece people there very and much – and the bakeries,too! During our holidays I scribbled down a list with breads I had to bake when I’m back home.

Among the breads of this list was the Pain Pavé as well as this Sübrot. Sü comes from Sou which means a very small coin and Brot means bread so Sübrot can be translated to “Penny bread”. During wartimes it was a cheap bread that due to its form could be purchased in pieces as well. And even nowadays I was asked if I wanted the whole loaf or only a part of it when I bought it in a Boulangerie in Strasbourg.

Back home, when I decided to bake my own version, I decided to go to a slow rising dough, which fermented over night at roomtemperature. The next morning I divided the dough, shaped two squares and spread a thin layer of oil on top of one of them. The oil layer hast to be really thin to ensure that the bread do not unfold to quickly in the oven, so I removed a part of it again with a paper towel. And that worked very well, indeed. I was sit in front of the oven all the time, fascinated by the unfolding bread.

And the finished bread is a treat, too: Open crumb, crisp crust and a mild but complex taste!

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February 22nd, 2014

Pain Pavé

Pain Pavé (2)During our last vacation in france I fell in love with the flat, rustic looking Pain Pavé. Pavé means cobblestone and refers to the flat, rectangular shape of the breads. Most of the time they are cut crosswise or with a rhombical pattern.

My version of the Pavé is made with rye sourdough and a long, cold fermentation in the fridge. That helps, together with the folds of the dough, to develope an open crumb and a deep, complex flavour.

It is a bread which goes very well with a flavourful winter soup or very simple with only some goat brie!

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February 16th, 2014

Weekend Rolls

Wochenend-Brötchen

After all the sweet posts something hearty is needed here on the Blog!

At the moment I bake a lot of bread using my sweet starter because I’m still in love with my not sour sourdough. I hope it is not getting boring for you. But the sweet starter allows me even to make dough which can rise in the fridge for 24 hours or longer without degrading the gluten or getting to sour. I used a cold fermented dough already for this baguettes. My weekend rolls work the same way, the dough rise in the cold for 12 to 36 hours and whenever I need rolls on the weekend I take some dough out and bake them freshly. The recipe will yield 10 Rolls, but the recipe can easily be doubled. A perfect recipe for a lazy weekend!

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January 30th, 2014

Oberberger Ärpelbrot

Kartoffelbrot

In the dialect of the region where I live – the Oberbergische Land – potatoes are called “Ärdäppel” which means earth apple. In a shorter variant it is drawn together to “Ärpel”. And putting some potatoes in a bread dough (which makes it to a Ärpelbrot – Potato bread) was a good idea to all times. In former times this helps to save precious flour (especially in regions where grains do not grow so well like here in the Oberbergische Land), and nowadays we like the effect which potatoes have on the bread, keeping it moist and making the crumb soft and tender.

It is a great bread for all meals, and with the curved slashes it is a beautiful eye catcher as well.

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