October 23rd, 2016

Oberländer Bread

Oberländer Brot (3)The “Oberländer” Bread is a bread with tradition and stormy history: In 1829 the city council of cologne fixed the price for bread. The Bakers did not agree and so the bakers strike started. To get bread for the city, the council ordered bread in the region upriver, the so called “Oberland”. As this region has poor soil, the bread is baked with lots of rye there. This yields a bread with long shelf life and so it could be easily transported down the rhine to cologne. The cologne inhabitants liked the bread very much and even after the strike was ended they insisted on getting their beloved “Oberländer”. And so this bread is baked in cologne until today.

The characteristic shine of the crust is due to a glaze made of starch and water. Another characteristic trait of this bread are the tree slashes across the loaf. It is a mild rye bread with a fine crumb and a long shelf life. It pairs well with both hearty and sweet. And so it is both a beautiful bread for the regionalen Bread series and a good gift for someone who just moved to cologne.

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October 20th, 2016

Rosewater Raspberry Macarons

Rosenwasser-Himbeer-Macarons (1)When I read about the “Törtchen-Törtchen book on tour”-Challenge I was hooked. I love baking Mousse-Cakes (Törtchen) and I like Matthias Ludwigs recipes for them. They work well both as whole as you can see here with the Apple tartlets as well as in parts like the sponge here in this Peach recioe.

The sobering came when the book arrived. I had to pick from four: a cupcake (too much buttercream and finding fresh apricots in October would be a  mission impossible),  a brownie filled with fruits (even the picture in the book was not appealing), pecan caramel tartlet (means shortcrust filled with nuts and caramel, sweet and boring) and Macaron lollies (why to put a macaron on a stick?). So I send a mail asking if I could maybe get another recipe, but the answer was short and clear: It had to be one of these four.

Sighed. So Macarons it will be… Continue reading

October 16th, 2016


KürbisstutenIn this year Indian summer lasted long. But now the days are getting shorter and air is chilly when I leave the house in the morning. And when I drive through the range of the hills I can see the first sun rays turning the misty valleys below into golden lakes. It is autumn, finally.

And so a recipe, which I got from a reader some weeks ago, fits into this beginning autumn very well. It is a recipe for pumpkin “Stuten”. Literally the term “Stuten” means “Mare” and my reader was very puzzled about it when she moved to Oldenburg many years ago and the bakeries were advertising “It is Pumpkin-Stuten time again”. But in Westphalia, Lower Saxony and Schleswig-Holstein the term means “sweet bread” as well as “horse”. And this pumpkin bread was a steady companion for my reader in the following years.

And when I asked for local recipes she sent a recipe from her kids kindergarten. I modified it strongly (ok, I tore it down and rebuild it from the fragments), so it contains now much less yeast but a preferment and some more liquid, too. And I kneaded the dough much longer as well. All of this together makes the bread irresistibly soft and aromatic. A great bread for autumn!

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October 9th, 2016


VinschgerlThe third recipe for my rye bread tribology for the “Schwarzmarkt” is a recipe for Vinschgerl. It is similar to the one I posted back in 2012 but I changed a bit the handling and so I decided to post this one, too. The first thing I changed is the fact that I form the rolls in two batches. The first one after 30 min, the second one after 55 min. So the second batch can proof while the first one is proofing. This makes the time management more easy! The second change is that I learned to steam rye breads with a bit of delay. This improves the “crack-forming” in the crust and yields better looking breads :-).

The flavour of this rolls is perfect for all lovers of spiced bread: With fennel, caraway seeds, coriander and the characteristic “Schabzingerklee” their flavour is delicious and incomparable.


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October 1st, 2016

Review: Baking course “Rolls”

Panousi FotografieAbout 200 rolls made from about 12kg flour, that was the outcome of a sucessful bread baking day. The theme of the successful second bread baking course  was “homemade rolls” and took place in “raum44”. I knew already from the first course that my time schedule was working properly but I was a bit nervous anyway. But as soon as the first cheerful participants arrived I relaxed as I realized that this was going to be great day!

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September 30th, 2016

East Frisian Black Bread with Sunflower Seeds

Friesisches Schwarzbrot (1)The very first suggestion I got for the post series “regional bread” was East Frisian Black Bread. As I already wrote a recipe for the magazine “Ö” I needed another variant – and decided to create a new recipe using sun flower seeds and coarse rye in a soaker. A bigger batch of sugar beet syrup makes the crumb darker and adds a subtle sweetness to the sour flavour notes from the sourdough.

It is a very aromatic black bread, and the soaker helps to create a moist crumb. Cut in slices and wrapped in paper I took it with me to the food swap “Schwarzmarkt” in cologne. A attentive reader maybe already noticed that I used the food swap to bake a big batch of different rye breads. It was a good opportunity to bake a lot of rye breads without suffering from my sensibility to rye. and to provide you, my dear reader, a new batch of rye recipes. This is for me another advantage of this great Swap.


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September 25th, 2016


Onjeschwedde (2)

I’m totally thrilled about all the little jewels I meet in range of my “regional bread” series. From Annette I got describtion of the Bread Onjeschwedde, which is a raisin bread speciality of Rheydt – a  part of Mönchengladbach.  It is baked with the loaves touching each other a methode which keeps the bread very soft and moist. Before baking it is slashed with a curved long cut and some small cuts on the sides. The so called “Rheydter Flower”.

The name “onjeschwedde” means literally “not sweated” and means that the bread is made with “green” flour – freshly milled flour of newly harvest grains. This flour contains more moisture then a ripened flour which looses the moisture – it sweats! As it was just harvest  time, so I called my local mill and ask. And indeed they promised me fresh flour for September.

The second special thing about this bread is that it is made with a huge amount of rye – 40% to be precise. It is the first sweet bread I met with this high amount rye! And so I used sourdough as preferment, which adds a deepness to its aroma, rounded by a faint cinnamon flavour. Sweetness comes from a bit of sugar and currants.  The taste is something special, a sweet bread but with its very own, distinct flavour. A great bread which needs nothing more then a bit of butter!

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September 19th, 2016

Bread baking course for Beginners – A review

Brotbacken für Anfänger (38)Done! The first two bread baking courses are lying behind us.

The subtitle of the course could be “Some like it hot”, too, as the summer came back with full power at the end of  august. Even in the normaly cooler “Bergische Land” we reach temperatures above 30°C. Already at 10 o’clock it was hot, and the three ovens which were already running heated the room additionally. But that does not stop the participants – fearless they all dive into the dough.

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September 18th, 2016

Rheinisches Krustenbrot

Rheinisches Krustenbrot (1)The second bread for my regional bread collection is one I know well: a crusty bread from the rhineland, called “Rheinisches Krustenbrot”.

These crusty breads you can find in different parts of Germany and they vary in the amount of rye which is added to the dough. I know it as a mild bread with only 10% rye flour added. It is baked with seamside up which creates the typical rustic look of this bread. It has a light, fluffy crumb and – as the name suggested – a thick, crunchy crust.

I baked my version of this bread using two different sourdoughs: A rye sourdough which adds a hearty note to the flavour and which contains all of the rye in the formula, and a mild wheat sourdough which adds a joghurt like note to the taste of the bread.


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