July 29th, 2015

Pide with Mangold Tomato Filling

Pide

Zorra asked us to bake flat breads for the Bread Baking Day. When my boyfriends parents gave us a lot of beautful mangold from their garden, I had the idea to fill Pide with them. When I checked recipes for the dough I realized that they all contain much or very much oil. So When I put my recipe together, I opted for a lot oil, some milk for an extra soft dough and a spoonful of unfed sourdough for a better flavour (the pide were a quick decision for dinner with no time for preferments).

Oil, on one hand, makes the dough soft and easy to handle, but on the other hand building up the gluten network is inhibited. So the dough needs to be kneaded intensively on slow speed. But after about 15 min you will get the perfect dough, which can be formed without any sticking.

The pide is delicious warm and cold (perfekt for lunch-at-work) and can be filled with other delicious thinks like spinach as well!

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July 25th, 2015

Blueberry Jam (without gelling sugar)

Blaubeermarmelade (1)

It’s early in the morning, the air is nicely warm and the wind carries the fungous smell of moist forest ground. All around us are blueberry bushes in the light shadow of birches and pine trees. This means summer for me! Slowly we pick berry and berry. After two hours I feel completely relaxed and our basket contains one kilogram of Blueberries.

Back home we washed the fruits, picked out the leaves and started to cook blue berry jam. Again we decided to go for the purist version using just blueberries, sugar and lemon juice. The lemon juice adds some tartness and is important for the gelling process. Together with sugar the acid is needed to bring the pectin molecules closer together to form pectin chains which is the reason why the jam  is gelling.

And as I had the feeling that recipes for jams made without jelly sugar is interesting for some people, is here my recipe for blueberry jam:

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July 24th, 2015

Rose Bud Rolls

RosenbrötchenI hope that you did not start to think that there is no bread baked in our hose anymore. But the hot weather and the start into a new job make me bake less. So we emptied the bread drawer in our freezer (very good, more room for new bread) and I baked “old” favourite recipes like lye rolls or a Sunday braid. Going back to old favourites is sometimes very good, too.

But now the freezer is empty, the temperature is back to tolerable and so I baked rolls for breakfast last Sunday. Nowadays I add some egg yolk into the dough for rolls most of the time, as the lecithin helps to make the crumb tender. The dough is good for rising at cold temperature over night as well, but then you have to take care of degasing it carefully the next morning. Otherwise the crumb of the dough will be to open, and for a breakfast roll I prefer rolls with a even crumb. Big holes and honey goes not well together.

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July 19th, 2015

Black and Red Currant Mousse Cake

Johannisbeer-Mousse-Törtchen (3)

In  my parents garden grows one single cassis bush next to the red currant bushes. When I was picking berries two weeks ago I sneaked some cassis into my bowl as well, as I had already the plan in my mind to serve little mousse cakes for the Sunday coffee with my parents.

Light mousse cakes made with Joghurt, berries and white chocolate are especially delicious on hot summer days. I did something similar already as filling of this raspberry charlotte. This time I topped a chocolate sponge with a mousse made of a mixture of red currant and cassis. The mousse hides a kernel of currants and cassis compote. It is a delicious little cake with a slight sourness and bit of sweetness, perfect for lazy Sunday afternoons.

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July 12th, 2015

Bread Baking For Beginners XVIII: Seeded Beer Bread

Saaten-Bierbrot (2)There are three different ways to soak seeds or flour: You can either cook them, or soak them in hot water or in cold water.   For this bread I decided to soak the seeds in cold water. They do not absorb not as much water as when hot water is used, and this results in seeds which have still some bite. As the seeds have to soak overnight some salt is added to prevent them from fermenting.

Seeds in a dough can inhibit gluten development and so the soaker is added after ten minutes of kneading. The dough is firm at the beginning and will get softer when the soaker, which contains some free water as well, is added.

For a hearty flavour I bake this bread with some beer. It is a mild organic weiss beer, but you can start to experiment with different kinds of beers. A dark brew, for example, would bring the beer flavour forward and would yield in a very hearty bread.

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July 5th, 2015

Orangeade

OrangenlimonadeNearly always I prefer to drink water for refreshment, most of the time sparkling water, sometimes tap water (the tap water here has a very good quality). But when the temperature rise I sometime I like to have water with some flavour. A virgin hugo for example or a simple glass of water with a piece of orange or lemon. And when the temperature hits the 37°C mark like in the last days,  I even like to have a glass of a cool homemade Orangeade.

My version 2.0 profits from the experiences with making orange powder. Simmering the orange and lemon zests sets free much more flavour and colour then simple infusing the zests in the orange juice. That I double the amount of the zests helps of course as well. And if the second orange is not needed for juice then cut them in pieces and use them to serve with the orange. This adds even more flavour and looks beautiful as well.

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July 4th, 2015

Raspberry and Red Currant Jam (without gelling sugar)

Himbeer-Johannisbeer-Gelee (1)

The 1:1 gelling sugar was sold out this weekend in our supermarket. Buying 2:1 or 3:1 was not an option for me as I like to avoid having preservatives like potassium sorbate in my homemade jams.  All 2:1 and 3:1 gelling sugars contain some preservatives to cope with the reduced amount sugar. And so I stand in the sugar aisle, mused about jam making and decided to cook it in the “good old way” without gelling sugar.

Since some years I cook already my quince jelly only with quince juice, sugar and citron juice if needed, and always get an red-orange jelly with an intense flavour. Red currants contains a lot of pectin as well and so cooking them without gelling sugar sounded like a good idea. To reduce the risk of burning the jam, I let the berries simmer for 20 minutes without sugar, before I  pass the softened fruits through a sieve and mixed it with the sugar. Starting with  1750g berries I ended with 1000g berry pulp and about 350g leftover seeds, meaning that a lot of water was evaporated. This leads to a dark red, aromatic jam and I’m sure that I will do my red currant jams in this way now all the time!

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June 29th, 2015

Falafel

Falafel (1)After the successful disputation we always have a little party with delicious food. After the exiting defense the newly made doctor need something to refresh and we others need it as well. There is nothing more existing for all of us!

For the last defense I was asked to make Falafel and so I spend the morning rolling them. I needed 45 min to form 100 Falafel and after 50 I asked myself if I was doing to many. But when I then placed the freshly fried falafels on the buffet, they were gone so fastly that I knew that 100 was the perfect number. And when I was asked if the recipe is already on the blog, I had to say no. But now it is :-)

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June 28th, 2015

Chubz

Chubz (2)Do you know this? You take a photograph, and another one, and another one. And nothing looks good. This Arabian flatbread, Chubz, is one of this cases. It is so … flat. After ten minutes of unsatisfying pictures my beloved one turn nervous and declared that bread and falafel would be better in our stomach then on a picture. And he was right, of course. So I put away the camera and we sat down to eat.

Chubz is a stable in the Arabian cuisine. In Germany you will find it falafel stalls where the chickpea balls are wrapped together into the bread. They are traditional baked in clay ovens, where they are place on the oven wall. They are simple breads made with flour, water, oil, salt and yeast. My variant of the flatbread uses wild yeasts from two kinds of sourdough what makes it very aromatic. They are baked at highest temperature in the oven (300°C) and there they need only 90 seconds until they puff up and got golden brown speckles on the surface.

The next day I give the picture another try and after a night of sleep my creative brain was working better.  I put the rolled leftover breads in a glass to gain some height which gave me a more appealing picture.

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June 27th, 2015

Bread Baking for Beginners XVII: Bagel

Bagel (10)I was asked to include a bagel recipe in my little course about bread baking and I was very willing to do so. Bagels are a good recipe for beginners as the dough is quite firm and not sticky at all. Kneading on the other hand can be a little work out because of the firm dough, too. But kneading a bagel dough is important to get a chewy bagel. So turn on some music and start kneading!

Another important point is boiling the bagels prior to baking. The longer you cook, the denser the bagel will become, as the proteins and starch on the outside of the bagel start already to set, preventing the bagel from rising to much in the oven. I like Bagel on the softer side, so I boil them for 30 seconds on each side. But play around with this time to get your personal perfect bagel! Continue reading

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