Category Archives: Rolls

April 17th, 2017

Easter Bunny Buns

Osterhschen-1_thumb22Easter without some Easter Bunny Buns is possible – but somehow sad. Easter Bunny Buns in various shapes belong to my Easter Breakfast since childhood. And so I used some of the dough I kneaded for the Easter bread to form some Bunnies, too.

For an easy shaping two things are important: kneading the dough to full gluten development and cooling the dough for about two hours in the fridge. This solidify the butter and adds some plasticity to the dough. The bunnies I formed with the cold dough are simple but already the forth variant I have on the blog (Here you can find Number one, two and three. Its already a little collection of possible shape 😀 !

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March 24th, 2017

Springbrötchen

Springbrötchen (3)The next regional bread recipe is from Northern Germany, too. Or, to be more precise, from Osnabrück. It is a roll which roots in meagre days when good flour with a high amount of gluten was rare. The poor flour quality results in a finer, denser crumb and a smaller volume then normal rolls. To archive good looking rolls with a nice crust despite the flour quality the bakers used a trick. They spread the rolls with different kinds of mixtures which results on a crisp, and crackled crust. This special look of the crust gave the rolls their name “Springbrötchen” (lit. Cracked Rolls).

The flavour of the crumb is slightly sweet while the crust is very hearty. The hearty flavour stems from the last mixture which is applied on the rolls: It is a mixture of fat and baker’s ammonia. The slight alkalinity of the baker’s ammonia has a similar effect like lye for making pretzels and gives the rolls their specific flavour. The hint of sweetness is archived by a bit of sugar and the addition of some milk and is a lovely contrast to the  flavour of the crust. I like the flavour very much and there are already new recipe variants with preferments circling in my mind. Always a sign that I like a recipe…

 

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February 24th, 2017

Rustic Potato Rolls

rustikale Kartoffelbrötchen (2)Sometimes it is just time to use leftovers. Like last friday, when I looked around in the kitchen: there was some leftover fine rye meal from the blackbread, a small bowl with mashed potatoes and in the fridge I found a lonely egg yolk. And so I combined everything and kneaded a dough for the next day. As I prefer freshly baked rolls for breakfast, the dough rose overnight in the fridge.

When we get up on Saturday I went straight to the kitchen and formed the rolls. And while we get ourselves ready, cooked coffee and lay out the table, the rolls proofed and got baked. And when we then had breakfast with the flavourful fluffy rolls I thought once again: leftover recipes can be so great!

 

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January 15th, 2017

Moist Whole Wheat Rolls

Saftige Vollkornbrötchen (1)The moment I took the Luftikusse from the oven my never resting mind started to muse about a whole grain variant. And it needed just Michas comment to sent me straight to the kitchen to try it.

Whole grain flour needs more water then white flour, that is a well known fact. And the psyllium  hulls can bind a lot of water, too. Nevertheless I was surprised by the amount of water I needed to reach the right consistency when I prepared the dough. At the end there was more water then flour in the dough. It yielded good rolls but I found the amount of water a bit to much, anyway. And so I changed the recipe, using less water and bit of sugar beet syrup to break the slight bitterness of the bran.

And with this second try I was happy. They have a nice, moist crumb and stay fresh for a long time. They are not as airy as their siblings but a delicious, more healthy variant. The right roll for a healthy lunch break!

 

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January 7th, 2017

Luftikusse

Luftikusse (1) The first post in 2017 found its inspiration back in 2016. When I put together my “Best of 2016” I stumbled upon upon a  readers question for rolls with open crumb. Back then I suggested this Baguette rolls and then the question slowly slipped from my mind. It has a simple reason: I normally prefer rolls with a finer crumb as we eat them mainly for breakfast and a wide open crumb means honey dropping all over the place. But during vacations we like to eat rolls for lunch or dinner, too. And with a slide of cheese a chiabatta-like roll is a delicious thing.

But the infection I catch before christmas was a mean one and so I spent most of my vacation on the sofa with hot tea and a good book – slowly recovering. I slept a lot, but baked nearly nothing and we went not for shopping food either but feed on our well stocked pantry and fridge. When we finally had to buy some groceries I discovered something new in our supermarket: organic pysillum hulls. I find their water binding capacity fascinating and so a package went home with me.

 

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December 3rd, 2016

Anisbrezen

Anisbrezen (2)When I was researching another recipe, I stumbled upon the recipe for anise pretzels . These pretzles are made without lye and are typically served during winter in the region Upper Franconia. They contain a lot of anise, as their name promise.

Interestingly it seems that the recipe vary from town to town: In Weidenberg the dough is made  without the addition of fat, while in a recipe from Bayreuth the dough is enriched with some milk and butter. I liked the richer variant more and so my dough contains both milk and butter, too. A egg yolk is added as emulsifier and helps to create fluffy and soft crumb.

 

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November 15th, 2016

Röggelchen

Röggelchen (2)

In the cologne pubs (called “Brauhaus”) exists a dish with confuse tourists regulary. It is called “Halve Hahn” and the tourists translate this with “half rooster” and expect to get a half roasted chicken when they order it. What they get is one half of twin-roll together with old gouda cheeses, mustard and some onions. There are many theories to explain the name of the dish – one is that once upon time someone asked in the cologne dialect if he could get on half of the roll: “Ääver isch will doch bloß ne halve han” (But I want just one half).

The roll that comes with the dish is called “Röggelchen” (little rye) and is baked as twin roll. You can tell in which city the roll was baked by the way it was formed: The Röggelchen from Düsseldorf has a round shape while the Cologne one’s shape is long. Both in common is that they are made partly with rye. In this variant the rye is used to make a sourdough, which adds complex flavour notes to the rolls. Another typical characteristic is the dark, shining crust which is due to a glazing which is made with roasted starch and applied before and after baking.

 

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October 31st, 2016

Hotdog Rolls

Hotdog-Brötchen (1)Hotdogs would be a good idea for dinner, said my love to me. I had no objections as I had in the freezer some vegetarian “Feuer-Jakob”  made from the recipe of Herr Grün. As rolls we needed homemade ones, of course! And so I fed my favourite preferment and soon afterwards I was happily kneading a dough. With a water roux and some enzym active malt the crumb of the rolls become especially soft and fluffy. To avoid cracks in the crust the rolls have to proof fully before baking – just like a burger roll.

We eat our hotdogs with home made fried onions, homemade pickled cucumbers and – for the vegetarian variant with grilled vegetables and Zucchini-Salsa. A delicious treat!

 

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October 9th, 2016

Vinschgerl

VinschgerlThe third recipe for my rye bread tribology for the “Schwarzmarkt” is a recipe for Vinschgerl. It is similar to the one I posted back in 2012 but I changed a bit the handling and so I decided to post this one, too. The first thing I changed is the fact that I form the rolls in two batches. The first one after 30 min, the second one after 55 min. So the second batch can proof while the first one is proofing. This makes the time management more easy! The second change is that I learned to steam rye breads with a bit of delay. This improves the “crack-forming” in the crust and yields better looking breads :-).

The flavour of this rolls is perfect for all lovers of spiced bread: With fennel, caraway seeds, coriander and the characteristic “Schabzingerklee” their flavour is delicious and incomparable.

 

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